Feel exhausted all the time? The 3 morning mistakes you're probably making | The Sun

Feel exhausted all the time? The 3 morning mistakes you're probably making | The Sun

11/09/2022

THERE seems to be two types of people when it comes getting up in the morning.

One is throwing the covers back and bounding out of bed, with the other snoozing their alarm several times before dragging themselves out of their slumber.

If you're in the latter camp, you likely feel that way because you're exhausted.

Whether it's down to a late night or you're suffering with fatigue on a regular basis – it can be hard to function when you're tired.

Now one expert has said that this feeling, could be down to three morning mistakes you are making.

Neuroscientist Dr Andrew Huberman said your actions first thing in the morning can help you to feel alert all day.

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The expert, who is a professor in the Department of Neurobiology at the Stanford University School of Medicine, said the first thing you should prioritise is natural light.

1. GET OUTSIDE

On his podcast 'After Skool' he said setting yourself set up for a good night's' sleep starts as soon as you wake up.

He explained that getting outside within the first hour of waking up is key as it activates cortisol – which is your body's natural boost.

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And you don't need to be going out for long periods of time, as Dr Huberman said just five to ten minutes will do.

"Once every 24 hours, you're going to get a healthy boost in cortisol. It sets the rhythm of your temperature rhythm motion, it sets your level of alertness, as well as your level of focus and your mood.

"You want that boost in cortisol to happen as early in the day as possible," he explained.

If you don't get out early in the day, then this could contribute to poor sleep – which is why you might be waking up tired, he said.

The guru explained that if you don't get out first thing, then your cortisol boost will happen later in the day, in turn, making it harder to go to bed.

He added that artificial light from lamps and phones is not enough to get this boost.

Going outside also releases dopamine, Dr Huberman added, which can also help you feel more motivated throughout the day.

"Dopamine's main role in the brain and body is to drive motivation, craving, and pursuit. It is not the molecule of pleasure, it is the molecule of drive," he said.

2. DELAY YOUR CUP OF JOE

If you're feeling tired, it almost feels natural to reach for a cup of tea or coffee.

But Dr Huberman said you should try and delay this for at least 90 minutes after you wake up.

This is because when we are sleepy, a chemical called adenosine builds up in the brain – telling us to go to sleep – caffeine then blocks this.

He said: "If you wake up in the morning and you didn't sleep quite as much as you would have liked and you're still sleepy, that means you still have a buildup of adenosine in your system."

But if the thought of waiting for over an hour for your first coffee hit is too much, Dr Huberman said you can gradually push this time back each day before 90 minutes becomes a breeze.

3. GET WARM

If you're all snuggled up in bed, then it's hard to get out, regardless of whether you feel tired or not.

The guru explained that the body temperature of a human rises slightly before we wake up, and drops to its lowest point in the middle of the night.

The goal, he said, is to raise our temperature in order to be awake.

The best way to do this, he said, is to exercise in the morning.

But if you're not a fan of this, he said you can also take a cold shower or bath.

While this might seem contradictory, Dr Huberman explained that when the surface of your body is cold, from the bath or shower water, your internal temperature will rise to compensate for this.

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He added that during this time, your body and brain also release dopamine, which can continue to ooze out until hours after you have been exposed to the water.

The guru added that when you combine light exercise and cold water in the morning, then you effectively create a summer environment for your body.

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