Jade Wright-Guy lost ten years of her life to anorexia

Jade Wright-Guy lost ten years of her life to anorexia

01/02/2022

Support worker, 26, who can barely remember her life between 15 and 25 after suffering anorexia says her disease was so severe she refused to drink water

  • Jade Wright-Guy has experienced the trauma of an eating disorder since 15 
  • The education support worker ‘can’t remember’ a 10 years of her life
  • She would avoid socialising, didn’t eat for weeks and refused to drink water  
  • She found strength after realising she wanted something more for herself  

Jade Wright-Guy was 15 when she fell into the grips of an eating disorder.

As her condition deteriorated, she became so fixated on restricting her diet she would avoid socialising and refused to drink water.

The now 26-year-old education support worker from Melbourne said anorexia ‘took away a decade of her life’ as she can’t recall much between the ages of 15 and 25.

‘I feel like I missed out on my whole life. I was in a constant state of survival and wasn’t enjoying life,’ Jade told FEMAIL. 

Jade Wright-Guy (pictured) said anorexia ‘took away a decade of her life’ as she can’t recall from the years of 15 to 25

‘I feel like I missed out on my whole life. I was in a constant state of survival and wasn’t enjoying life,’ Jade told FEMAIL 

After being born three months early, Jade said she’s ‘always been small and thin’ but her condition began after the near-death of one of her family members.

‘I remember being so stressed that I couldn’t eat and felt like I couldn’t control anything that was happening,’ she said.

School wasn’t the best time for Jade either as she ‘didn’t have a support network’ and was bullied by other students.

It was during the summer holiday period that her conditioned worsened because she had so much time alone.

‘It was the perfect storm for an eating disorder to thrive in – I was alone a lot. Over time I would start to not eat meals,’ she said. 

Jade was admitted into hospital on January 26, 2012 after losing 10kg and having extremely low blood pressure and blood sugar levels.

From there she was in and out of hospital more than 20 times and was often too unwell to leave the house.

‘Doctors made sure I was medically well, not mentally well – so when I left hospital, I would be back a few days later,’ she said.  

‘More than anything, my head was just telling me I was worthless.’  

From being born three months early as a premature baby, Jade said she’s ‘always been small and thin’ but her condition began after the near-death of one of her family members

‘I remember a 28-year-old woman came in and thinking ‘I do not want to be here when I’m 28 and living the same life’,’ she said 

A huge ‘turning point’ for Jade was when she was 20 and in another long hospital admission.

‘I remember a 28-year-old woman came in and thinking ‘I do not want to be here when I’m 28 and living the same life’,’ she said.

‘I think in that moment I realised how much of my life I had already missed out on, and to think that could still be my life was overwhelming.

‘I’ve already lost 10 years to anorexia, I refuse to lose more.’ 


She was in and out of hospital more than 20 times and was often too unwell to leave the house

Being determined to take control and find strength to overcome the condition, Jade learnt through therapy there’s a difference between ‘thought and fact’.

‘When anorexia would tell me I’m worthless or disgusting for eating a meal, I would think ‘okay that’s a thought, where’s the evidence? What’s the fact behind this?’ And immediately I can’t think of anything that would make that a fact,’ she said.

‘My anorexia telling me I’m fat for eating a meal is a thought, but me eating because I want to be happy is a fact – there’s no power behind the thought if there’s no fact.

Being determined to take control and find strength to overcome the condition, Jade learnt through therapy there’s a difference between ‘thought and fact’

At the moment Jade is struggling after testing positive to Covid-19 on December 3; she needs to remain in isolation at home for 10 days. 

‘I cried for hours the other day because my housemates need to prepare my meals for me and my eating disorder tells me that’s not okay,’ she said. 

‘It’s bringing back that past trauma of feeling isolated and alone, but I’m keeping busy by reading, meditating and calming myself’. 

While she still struggles with the condition today, Jade is motivated by the thought of having a better life for herself.

Looking back at old photos, Jade is saddened by how miserable she was as a teenager and young adult, but is hopeful for her future.

‘I know how unhappy I was – I was an empty shell of a human and my eating disorder controlled everything,’ she said.

While she still struggles with the condition today, Jade is motivated by the thought of having a better life for herself.

‘I look at myself now and I’m so happy, full of life, love and have contentment,’ she said. 

For the last four years she has felt empowered and confident in her body after taking part in pole dancing classes.

‘My body was so ruined before but now I’ve never felt stronger in my life,’ she said. 

Jade hopes her story reduces the stigma around anorexia and eating disorders and shared her experience with thousands on Instagram.    

If you need help or support for an eating disorder or body image issue, please call Butterfly’s National Helpline on 1800 334 673 or email support@thebutterflyfoundation.org.au

Source: Read Full Article