Parkinson’s disease: Brain condition known to significantly affect skin – what to spot?

Parkinson’s disease: Brain condition known to significantly affect skin – what to spot?

09/07/2021

Harry Styles' mum on her father having Parkinson's disease

We use your sign-up to provide content in ways you’ve consented to and to improve our understanding of you. This may include adverts from us and 3rd parties based on our understanding. You can unsubscribe at any time. More info

Parkinson’s disease is a common condition that’s caused by the brain becoming more and more damaged over a long period of time. Many are unaware of how one’s skin can signal the condition and as such, could be an early warning symptom too.

People with Parkinson’s often experience changes to their skin.

Changes in the skin could include oiliness and red, itchy, flaky skin known as seborrheic dermatitis.

European Parkinson’s Disease Association said: “The most common change in the skin with Parkinson’s is increased oiliness, particularly around the forehead, nose and scalp, where the sebaceous glands are concentrated.

“Parkinson’s can cause an excess secretion from these glands of an oily substance called sebum which keeps skin supple and provides protection, but in excess results in the skin looking greasy and shiny.”

People with Parkinson’s may produce more sebum than normal.

This condition is known as seborrhoea and means the skin, particularly the face and scalp, becomes greasy and shiny.

Seborrheic dermatitis is another common skin condition commonly found in people with Parkinson’s disorder.

“There are tiny glands called sebaceous glands below the surface of the skin,” said the Parkinson’s Foundation.

The site added: “These glands secrete an oily substance into the hair follicles.

“This oil normally helps protect the skin, but too much can cause problems referred to as seborrheic dermatitis.”

“There are tiny glands called sebaceous glands below the surface of the skin,” said the Parkinson’s Foundation.

The site added: “These glands secrete an oily substance into the hair follicles.

“This oil normally helps protect the skin, but too much can cause problems referred to as seborrheic dermatitis.”

Other signs of sebaceous dermatitis include:

Skin scales that are white and flaky or yellowish and oily

Itching

Redness

Chronically inflamed areas.

One study found that seborrheic dermatitis in the general population was associated with a small increased risk of developing Parkinson’s and may precede diagnosis.

This was found to be the same as how loss of smell, REM behaviour, sleep disorders and constipation may precede a Parkinson’s disease diagnosis.

However, this does not mean that everyone with seborrheic dermatitis will go on to develop Parkinson’s disease, but it suggests that in some people, the nerve damage that leads to seborrheic dermatitis is a harbinger for the condition.
Source: Read Full Article