Gamer, 32, whose username is 'Squid Game' says she is losing work

Gamer, 32, whose username is 'Squid Game' says she is losing work

11/03/2021

Gamer, 32, whose username is ‘Squid Game’ says she is losing work and subjected to a torrent of online abuse because of the Netflix hit

  • Lydia Ellery, 32, chose the social media handle Squid Game 11 years ago
  • Since the Netflix show was released she has been inundated with hate
  • Fans accused her of stealing the name and tried to hack her accounts
  • Ms Ellery is now considering changing the name of her successful brand 

A gamer who has gone by the name Squid Game for the last decade has been inundated with ‘hate’ from fans of the Netflix show.

Lydia Ellery, 32, chose the name for her online gaming channel because of her nickname ‘Squid’.

But she has since lost presenting work and had her various social media accounts hacked by enraged fans who think she stole the name from the Korean series.

The streamer, who lives in Bristol, set up her Twitch and Instagram profiles with the handle Squid Game 11 years ago. On Twitter, she goes by SquidGaming.

She has 42,300 followers on Twitch – where her fans can watch her play various video games – and is a member of Yogscast, which has more than seven million YouTube subscribers.

Instead of the brand she spent 11 years building, Google searches now only show results relating to the series.

‘I feel down about the whole situation and incredibly fed up,’ she said.

Ms Ellery told the BBC it was ‘just a stupid name’ she made up ‘on the spot’ – but she now has to consider changing it. She added: ‘My friends called me squid because it rhymes with lid, and my name is Lydia.’

Lydia Ellery (pictured), 32, chose the name for her online gaming channel because of her nickname ‘Squid’


The streamer, who lives in Bristol, set up her Twitch and Instagram profiles with the handle Squid Game 11 years ago. On Twitter, she goes by SquidGaming

Ms Ellery said she may have to change her handle because of the name clash

This year the name took on a new meaning when a Korean TV series became a Netflix smash hit.

The series tells the story of a group of debt-ridden people who sign up for a programme that promises to solve their problems, before going on to force them to play deadly children’s games.

It was watched by 142 million households around the world in its first four weeks.

The show itself doesn’t have an Instagram account, and Netflix uses its own account to advertise it, so Ms Ellery was inundated by messages.

She said: ‘I was flooded with people tagging me or sending me messages thinking I was the show.’

This year the name took on a new meaning when a Korean TV series became a Netflix smash hit

The series tells the story of a group of debt-ridden people who sign up for a programme that promises to solve their problems, before going on to force them to play deadly children’s games

And some social media users were furious with the gamer for taking the account name, even though it had been live for a decade.

Ms Ellery has been kicked out of her account several times, forcing her to reset passwords, and she has lost job opportunities because companies think she is associated with the show. 

It comes after Squid Game was blamed for a spike in the number of children needing skin grafts for serious burns after they tried to replicate one of the games.

The second challenge in the hugely popular Netflix programme sees contestants attempt to snap the edges of a honeycomb biscuit off until just a shape in the middle is left. Those who fail are executed.  

Ms Ellery has been kicked out of her account several times, forcing her to reset passwords, and she has lost job opportunities because companies think she is associated with the show

Pictured: Squid Game protagonist Seong Gi-hun attempts to remove the umbrella shape from a honeycomb biscuit

The viral ‘honeycomb challenge’ sees fans make the sweet treats from scratch at home, which involves melting down sugar at 150C to create the gooey mixture, which sticks to skin like glue.

Specialist burns units across the country have been hit with a spate of children aged between 11 and 15 suffering serious injuries since the show’s release.

The British Burn Association (BBA) posted an image of a burnt hand on Twitter, writing: ‘Burns services are seeing a spike in burn injuries following #squidgame and social media #honeycomb trend. Many are requiring surgery to treat.’

BBA Deputy Chair Professor Kayvan Shokrollahi is concerned the increasing number of children injured after copying the trend could be the ‘tip of the iceberg’.   

Google searches for ‘honeycomb recipe’ have rocketed in the UK since the show released last month.   

MailOnline has contacted Ms Ellery, Twitch and Netflix for comment. 

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