Migrants use ropes to scale Ceuta walls in a bid to sneak into Europe

Migrants use ropes to scale Ceuta walls in a bid to sneak into Europe

05/21/2021

Migrants use ROPES to scale walls of Ceuta in bid to sneak into Europe as bodies wash up on the shore and Spain sends over 6,000 people back to Morocco

  • WARNING: GRAPHIC CONTENT 
  • Migrants were seen scaling the walls of Ceuta on Friday in bid to get into Europe
  • On Friday, 30 migrants also crossed over into enclave Melilla and scaled fences
  • It comes just one day after bodies of migrants washed up on the shores of Ceuta 
  • The influx of migrants comes amid diplomatic row between Spain and Morocco 
  • Morocco is angered as Spain is treating Brahim Ghali, leader of Polisario Front

Migrants were seen attempting to scale the walls of Ceuta, one of Spain’s North African enclaves, in a bid to get into Europe from Morocco.

Pictures taken in the early hours of Friday morning showed a group of migrants using ropes in a desperate attempt to scale the walls of Ceuta’s port amid a diplomatic row between Spain and Morocco.

In Spain’s other North African enclave Melilla, around 300km (185 miles) east of Ceuta, some 30 migrants crossed over in the early hours on Friday, scaling the high, razor-wired fence, authorities confirmed.

Meanwhile, more than more than 6,000 migrants who swam to or climbed into Ceuta have been sent back to Morocco by Spain amid the enormous influx, it was confirmed on Friday.

It comes after bodies washed up on the shores of the Spanish enclave on Thursday as more than 8,000 people attempted to make the crossing from Morocco into Ceuta this week.

Photographs from Friday showed two migrants throwing a rope up the high border wall of Ceuta, before clambering on top of the barbed wire fence separating the city from Morocco.

Pictures taken in the early hours of Friday morning showed a group of migrants (pictured) using ropes in a desperate attempt to scale the walls of Ceuta’s port to get into Europe

Two migrants climbed the high border wall of Ceuta by throwing a rope up, before clambering on top of the barbed wire fence separating it from Morocco (pictured) 

The situation is Ceuta remained quiet on Friday as there were no new arrivals recorded for the second day in the Spanish city of 85,000.

The Spanish enclave is currently at the centre of a row between Spain and Morocco, after Moroccan authorities was said to have deliberately removed border guards and allowed the influx of migrants to make a political point.

The diplomatic row emerged between the two countries over Spain’s decision to provide medical treatment to militant leader Brahim Ghali, who has been fighting Morocco in a decades-long war.

Since Monday, a record 8,000-plus migrants have crossed into Ceuta from Morocco, prompting chaotic scenes as authorities struggled to manage the unprecedented influx.

But out of the 8,000 migrants, who crossed by swimming or jumping border fences, 6,600 have been sent back to Morocco by Spain, authorities confirmed on Friday. 

Morocco had appeared to loosen its border controls with Ceuta for two days on Monday, letting thousands of migrants pour into the enclave, which was widely viewed as retaliation for Spain’s hosting of the Western Sahara independence leader.

The situation is Ceuta remained quiet on Friday as there were no new arrivals recorded for the second day in the Spanish city of 85,000. Pictured: migrants climb the port of Ceuta

Since Monday, a record 8,000-plus migrants have crossed into Ceuta from Morocco, but 6,600 have been sent back to the North African country, it was confirmed on Friday

It comes after bodies washed up on the shores of Ceuta (pictured) after thousands of migrants attempted to make the crossing from Morocco into the Spanish city this week

Meanwhile, in nearby Melilla, a Spanish territory 220 miles west along the Mediterranean Sea next to Morocco, border security forces on both sides repelled groups of youths trying to get into Spain.

The Spanish government’s delegation in Melilla said that a few dozen made it in.

It comes as bodies washed up on the shores of Ceuta after thousands of migrants attempted to make the crossing from Morocco this week amid the ongoing diplomatic row. 

Heartbreaking photographs showed bodies washed up on the beach against the backdrop of a raging grey sea at the Spanish enclave, before Spanish Guardia Civil members moved the bodies from the shore.

Meanwhile, the Spanish interior minister said on Friday that he hoped the diplomatic spat with Morocco, over the influx of illegal migrants into Ceuta, would soon end. 

‘There was a disagreement (with Morocco) and we hope this disagreement will be as short-lived as possible,’ Interior Minister Fernando Grande-Marlaska told COPE radio station.

‘It is inconceivable that a humanitarian gesture should trigger a situation like the crisis in Ceuta.’ 

A senior Spanish diplomatic source added: ‘We have been calling for calm and moderation since this started. We still have a strategic relationship with Morocco.’

The enormous influx of people into Ceuta comes amid strained relations between Madrid and Rabat over the former’s decision to provide medical treatment for Brahim Ghali, the leader of the Polisario Front, who has Covid-19.

The armed group has fought for the independence of Western Sahara, a former Spanish colony mainly under Moroccan control, for decades. 

Heartbreaking photographs (above) showed the bodies washed up on the beach against the backdrop of a raging grey sea at the Spanish enclave 

Spanish Guardia Civil members were seen moving the bodies (pictured) from the shore of Ceuta on Thursday, after 8,000 migrants attempted to reach Europe this week

Spanish interior minister said on Friday he hoped the diplomatic spat with Morocco, over the influx of illegal migrants into Ceuta, would soon end. Pictured: Body of migrant at Ceuta

The influx of migrants comes amid strained relations between Madrid and Rabat over Spain’s decision to treat Brahim Ghali (above), the leader of the Polisario Front, who has Covid-19

Morocco’s minister of state for human rights, Mustafa Ramid, accused Spain on Thursday of committing a ‘reckless and totally unacceptable act’ in admitting Ghali without consulting Rabat. He said Morocco had ‘the right to lean back’ in response.

Officials in Rabat also said Polisario Front boss Brahim Ghali’s presence in Spain, where he entered with an Algerian passport under a false name, is unacceptable. 

The European Union has expressed solidarity with Spain over the crisis.  

Ghali, whom Morocco considers a terrorist, has been recovering from Covid-19 in a hospital in northern Spain since April 18.

He’s been summoned for questioning by Spain’s National Court on June 1 in a lawsuit for alleged torture and is being investigated for possible genocide in a separate case brought by dissident Sahrawi groups who oppose the Polisario.

On Thursday, Spain accused Morocco of ‘blackmail’ for allowing the influx of migrants to reach Ceuta amid tensions between the two neighbouring countries.

Spanish Defence Minister Margarita Robles said Morocco’s actions were ‘an aggression of Spanish borders and of the borders of the European Union’.

‘We are not talking about youths aged 16, 17, children as young as seven or eight were allowed through according to NGOs… ignoring international law,’ she said in an interview with Spanish public radio on Thursday.

‘Call it what you want but I call it blackmail,’ she said, adding ‘it is not acceptable to put the lives of minors or of people of one’s own country, at risk.’

Source: Read Full Article