Trump slams NYC mayoral primary as vote thrown into chaos after THOUSANDS of test ballots mistakenly counted

Trump slams NYC mayoral primary as vote thrown into chaos after THOUSANDS of test ballots mistakenly counted

06/30/2021

DONALD Trump has slammed New York City's mayoral primary as the vote was thrown into chaos after thousands of test ballots were mistakenly counted.

The 45th president again slammed the electoral process in a statement on Wednesday morning.

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"It was announced overnight in New York City that vast irregularities and mistakes were made and that Eric Adams, despite an almost insurmountable lead, may not win the race," Trump said, referencing the Democratic frontrunner for mayor.

"The fact is, based on what has happened, nobody will ever know who really won," he continued.

"Watch the mess you are about to see in New York City, it will go on forever. They should close the books and do it all over again, the old-fashioned way, when we had results that were accurate and meaningful."

The left-wing primary race was botched when Adams' campaign noticed the ballots on Tuesday before they were cleared from a computer.

That data had indicated that Brooklyn Borough President Adams, a former police captain who would be the city’s second black mayor, had lost much of his lead and was ahead of former sanitation commissioner Kathryn Garcia by fewer than 16,000 votes.

Then the Board of Elections tweeted that it was aware of "a discrepancy" in its report on ranked-choice voting results. It didn’t initially explain what that discrepancy was, even as it pulled the data from its website.

Just before 10.30pm it released a statement saying that 135,000 ballot images it had put into its computer system for testing purposes had never been cleared.

"The Board apologizes for the error and has taken immediate measures to ensure the most accurate up to date results are reported," it read.

The agency then scrubbed all results from the website, instead replacing them with a message saying: "Unofficial Rank Choice ­Results Starting on June 30."

The results initially released Tuesday, and then withdrawn, were incomplete to begin with because they didn’t include any of the nearly 125,000 absentee ballots cast in the Democratic primary.

Adams’ campaign, which had publicly pointed out the vote discrepancy shortly after the faulty count was released, said in a statement that it remained confident he would ultimately prevail.

The publicized vote totals had included an unexpected jump in the number of ballots counted Tuesday compared to the number counted on the day of the primary.

Garcia said in a late afternoon news conference, before the numbers were withdrawn, that she was confident she had a path to victory, but wasn’t "counting any chickens before they’ve hatched."

Later, her campaign issued a statement saying "The BOE’s release of incorrect ranked choice votes is deeply troubling and requires a much more transparent and complete explanation.

"Every ranked choice and absentee vote must be counted accurately so that all New Yorkers have faith in our democracy and our government."

Elections officials had planned on conducting another round of ranked choice analysis on July 6 that would include absentee ballots.

A note posted on the Board of Elections website indicated it would try posting accurate results without absentee ballots Wednesday.

New York City’s primary went into a state of suspended animation a week ago while officials prepared to give the public its first look at results from the city’s new ranked choice voting system.

Under the system, voters could rank up to five candidates in order of preference.

Since no candidate was the first choice of more than 50 percent of voters, a computer on Tuesday tabulated ballots in a series of rounds that worked like instant run-offs.

In each round, the candidate in last place was eliminated. Votes cast for that person were then redistributed to the surviving candidates, based on whoever voters put next on their ranking list. That process repeated until only two candidates were left.

Besides Adams and Garcia, civil rights lawyer Maya Wiley was also still within striking distance of victory.

When voting ended on June 22, elections officials only released results showing who voters put down as their first choice for the job.

In that count, Adams had a lead of around 75,000 votes over Wiley with Garcia close behind in third.

Wiley was critical of the BOE, saying the chaos Tuesday "is not just failure to count votes properly today, it is the result of generations of failures that have gone unaddressed."

New York City’s Board of Elections, which operates independently from City Hall, has long had a reputation for mistakes and mismanagement.

Ahead of the 2016 election, it mistakenly purged tens of thousands of voters from voting rolls.

In 2018, voters had to wait in line for several hours at some polling places over equipment issues.

In 2020, it struggled to process applications for absentee ballots and initially sent many voters ballots with return envelopes printed with the wrong people’s names on them.

The Democratic primary winner will be the prohibitive favorite in the general election against Curtis Sliwa, the Republican founder of the Guardian Angels.

Either Adams or Wiley would be the second Black mayor of New York City, and either Garcia or Wiley would be the first woman mayor.

Adams, 60, is a moderate Democrat who opposed the "defund the police" movement and said that under his leadership, the city could find a way to fight crime while also combating a legacy of racial injustice in policing.

He was previously a state senator before becoming Brooklyn’s borough president, a job in which he lacks lawmaking power, but handles some constituent services and discretionary city spending.

Garcia, 51, is a city government veteran who ran as a nonideological crisis manager well-suited to guiding New York out of a once-in-a-century pandemic.

Garcia ran the department of sanitation from 2014 until leaving last September to explore a run for mayor.

De Blasio also tapped Garcia to run an emergency food distribution program during the coronavirus pandemic after earlier appointing her interim chair of the city’s embattled public housing system.

She earlier served as chief operating officer of the city’s department of environmental protection, responsible for water and sewer systems.

Wiley, 57, served as counsel to Mayor Bill de Blasio and previously chaired a civilian panel that investigates complaints of police misconduct.

A former legal analyst for MSNBC, she ran as a progressive who would cut $1billion from the police budget and divert it to other city agencies.

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