West Sussex former pump station eco-home goes on market for £1.65m

West Sussex former pump station eco-home goes on market for £1.65m

10/21/2020

The house that pays for itself! Former pumping station eco-home which earns £100,000 a year as a holiday let and by selling surplus renewable energy back to National Grid goes on market for £1.65m

  • Five-bed home, at Nutbourne Common in Pulborough, West Sussex, received an award for its restoration 
  • It is A rated for efficiency and generates significant cash return for renewable energy; among eco innovations are ground source heat pump and photovoltaic arrays; home featured on TV show Restoration Home
  • The pumping station was originally built in the 1930s amid concerns of a typhoid outbreak in the area 
  • It now has over 5,000 sq ft of space, two 46ft interconnecting rooms, five bedrooms and three bathrooms

A former pumping station which earns £100,000 a year as a holiday let and from selling surplus energy to the National Grid has gone on sale for £1.65million.

The five-bedroom house, at Nutbourne Common in Pulborough, West Sussex, received an award for its conversion into a residential home and featured on the TV show Restoration Home, presented by Caroline Quentin.

The property is A rated for efficiency and generates a significant cash return for renewable energy. Among the eco innovations are a ground source heat pump and photovoltaic arrays.

The pumping station was originally built in the 1930s amid concerns of a typhoid outbreak in the area. The station carried on working until the 1970s.

This former pumping station which earns £100,000 a year as a holiday let and from selling surplus energy back to the National Grid has gone on sale for £1.65million

The five-bedroom house, at Nutbourne Common in Pulborough, West Sussex, received an award for its conversion into a residential home and featured on the TV show Restoration Home, presented by Caroline Quentin

The stunning property is A rated for efficiency and generates a significant cash return for renewable energy

Among the eco innovations are a ground source heat pump and photovoltaic arrays. Above, one of its five bedrooms

The pumping station was originally built after local residents in the 1930s became concerned by the possibility of a typhoid outbreak. The station carried on working until the 1970s

The conversion has won five awards, including the 2011 Sussex Heritage Trust Best House Award for its innovative and eco-friendly design and use of space

You can apply to get payments from your energy supplier if you generate your own electricity – for example, with solar panels or a wind turbine. This is called a ‘feed-in tariff’ (FIT).

Under the scheme, you’ll get a set amount for each unit (kilowatt hour or kWh) of electricity you generate – a ‘generation tariff’.

However, the rates vary depending on: the size of your system, what technology you install, when your system was installed and how energy efficient your home is

You can get payments from your current energy supplier, or you can choose a different one from the list of registered suppliers.

As well as the generation tariff, you can also sell any extra units you do not use back to your electricity supplier. This is called an ‘export tariff’.

For this, you will get 5.24p per unit of electricity.

You can sell back half of the units of electricity you generate.    Source: www.gov.uk

The original building was described as ‘an industrial-size bunker full of rusting, redundant, heavy duty machinery’.

Now it has more than 5,000 sq ft of space with two, 46ft interconnecting rooms, five bedrooms and three bathrooms.

The large basement has space for a games room or gym and outside there is parking for eight cars as well as a half-acre plot for the new owners to enjoy.

The conversion has won five awards, including the 2011 Sussex Heritage Trust Best House Award for its innovative and eco-friendly design and use of space.

But its new owner may be more interested in the cash it generates, with a gross income of £100,000 per annum.

Brent Mariner, from estate agents PurpleBricks, said: ‘It’s been used as a holiday property. 

‘The owners have enjoyed it for ten years but now they’ve decided to sell because they want to do other things and take on a fresh project.

‘It would suit a family coming out of London who want a more rural life in an amazing property. 

‘But with the vast living spaces, it’s the kind of place you could imagine a rock star wanting to own.’

If you generate your own electricity, you can apply to get payments from your energy supplier – for example, with solar panels or a wind turbine. This is known as a ‘feed-in tariff’ (FIT).

Under the scheme, you’ll get a set amount for each unit (kilowatt hour or kWh) of electricity you generate – a ‘generation tariff’. 

You can get payments from your current energy supplier, or you can choose a different one from the list of registered suppliers.

As well as the generation tariff, you can also sell any extra units you do not use back to your electricity supplier. This is called an ‘export tariff’.

For this, you will get 5.24p per unit of electricity. You can sell back half of the units of electricity you generate.

The original building was described as ‘an industrial-size bunker full of rusting, redundant, heavy duty machinery’

Today, it has more than 5,000 sq ft of space with two, 46ft interconnecting rooms, five bedrooms and three bathrooms

The large basement has space for a games room or gym and outside there is parking for eight cars as well as a half-acre plot for the new owners to enjoy. (Pictured, one of the bedrooms)

Its new owner may be more interested in the cash it generates, with a gross income of £100,000 per annum. Brent Mariner, from estate agents PurpleBricks, said: ‘It’s been used as a holiday property. The owners have enjoyed it for ten years but now they’ve decided to sell because they want to do other things and take on a fresh project’


Caroline Quentin is seen above in the TV show Restoration Home episode which features the Nutbourne pump house; right, some of the solar panels on the roof of the property

Mr Mariner added: ‘It would suit a family coming out of London who want a more rural life in an amazing property. But with the vast living spaces, it’s the kind of place you could imagine a rock star wanting to own’

Nutbourne Pump Station… and the typhoid outbreak

In 1893, around in one in ten inhabitants of Worthing were affected by typhoid – a bacterial infection spread via poor sanitation.

Around 200 people died from polluted drinking water and by the 1920s, fears grew in nearby Nutbourne.

A newspaper report at the time (August, 1893) stated: ‘The number of cases of typhoid now notified in Worthing has exceeded 1,150. 

‘At an adjourned meeting of the Town Council a few days ago it was decided to go to Shoreham for water for temporary purposes, and mains to be laid at once. 

‘It is hoped that well within a month fresh water will be in the town. Heartrending stories are told of families laid low by the disease. A general appeal has been made for funds to help the sick poor, and Worthing will need all the generous support her neighbours can give in the present lamentable state of affairs.’

A decision was made to build a pumping station after clean water was found on Nutbourne Common and construction began in 1930. 

The Pump House remained in operation until the 1970s, at which point it became obsolete.

A decision was made to build a pumping station after clean water was found on Nutbourne Common and construction began in 1930. (Above, the pump house before it was converted into the stunning property)

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